Category Archives: Counterfeit Goods

An INTA Hong Kong Debrief

After a week at the International Trademark Association Annual (INTA) Annual Meeting in Hong Kong, and another spent exploring the city and its surrounds, it’s nice to be heading back to the comparatively quaint major city we call home.  But as I fly through Siberian airspace, over the North Pole, and through Canada en route to Beantown, I have a few parting thoughts.

The Gateway to Everything

As the Gateway to Asia, Hong Kong is an international center of industry and commerce – a fact reflected in the spotless windows of its record number of skyscrapers, which every… More

Top Five Surprising Observations from the INTA Annual Meeting in Hong Kong

 

INTA annual meetings are always interesting, sometimes in ways that you don’t expect.  This year’s meeting is in Hong Kong.  I thought I would share my top five observations, both good and bad, about my experience so far.

On the good side of the ledger:

1. The Saturday night Gala was fun!  I had never attended it before, and it was really nice.  It was worth packing the extra black tie outfit, and I somehow even managed to navigate the shoe issue.  Thanks to Iris and Stephen at the Copyright Clearance Center for inviting me.

2. … More

U.S. Customs and Border Protection Proposes Greater Cooperation with IP Owners to Crack Down on Counterfeits

Earlier today, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) announced that it would disclose information to intellectual property owners regarding suspected counterfeit goods stopped at the border, in situations where CBP desires assistance from the IP owners to determine if the goods are genuine or counterfeit. According to the announcement, counterfeiting techniques have become so sophisticated that it is not always possible to tell the real from the fake. Without question, counterfeits can pose a grave danger to the health and safety of American consumers, as well as cause economic harm to legitimate… More

Google AdWords Appellate Decision Injects Some Uncertainty Back Into the Keyword Game

Just when you thought it was safe to bid on competitors’ trademarks as keywords — provided you played it smart, and didn’t put trademarks in the actual text of your sponsored ad except under certain limited circumstances — comes the Fourth Circuit’s decision in Rosetta Stone v. Google. In its opinion, the Fourth Circuit reverses, in significant part, the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia for its apparently hasty summary judgment order in favor of Google, remanding the case for further analysis.

The AdWords Dispute

As the result of… More

Congress Takes Aim at Counterfeit Drugs

Bills were introduced in both the House and the Senate earlier this month to increase the penalties for trafficking in counterfeit drugs. Both versions of the proposed “Counterfeit Drug Penalty Enhancement Act of 2011” (H.R. 3468 and S. 1886) would amend 18 U.S.C. § 2320, which criminalizes the use of counterfeit marks on or in connection with goods or services, to provide for enhanced penalties when the good in question is a drug.

A similar measure was introduced in October as part of H.R. 3261, the “Stop Online Piracy Act” or “SOPA,” a bill aimed primarily at… More

TIFFANY Update: False Advertising Claim Rejected

In what would appear to be the final chapter of the battle between online giant eBay and luxury jeweler Tiffany, a Southern District of New York judge has bounced Tiffany’s false advertising claim, the only claim remaining following a Second Circuit decision earlier this year.

  

On remand, the district court focused on whether eBay’s advertisements about the availability of Tiffany merchandise on its site misled or confused customers since at least some purportedly Tiffany products were counterfeit. Tiffany conceded that there was no… More

The Private Counterfeiting Police: Tiffany (NJ), Inc. v. eBay Inc.

There is something for trademark holders and service providers alike in the Second Circuit’s opinion in Tiffany (NJ), Inc. v. eBay Inc. (PDF). In that case, the court held, among other things, that eBay’s Herculean anti-counterfeiting measures precluded direct and contributory liability for trademark infringement. The court reasoned that under either theory of liability, the mere fact that a service provider, such as eBay, knows in a very general sense that its website contains counterfeit products will not, standing alone, suffice to establish infringement. In the court’s view, liability premised on a service provider’s inducement of infringing conduct requires,… More